As the complexity and cost of health care increase, many health care institutions have turned to information technology as a means of improving patient care. Electronic medical records, patient portals, digitized medical devices, and even wearables are becoming more broadly used. These systems have been largely transactional, but artificial intelligence (AI) systems that are capable of machine learning go beyond traditional medical transactions and record-keeping to analyze data, make decisions, and exercise judgment.

Because AI tools perform tasks previously performed by humans, they raise concerns about large-scale job loss in health care and other industries. Our view, however, is that “augmentation” of human labor is more likely than large-scale automation. …..more